Iroko Trees Fighting Climate Change

Yes, you did not hear it wrong. Iroko trees are fighting against climate change.
Iroko Trees are grown from the coasts of West Africa. Sometimes called Nigerian teak tree, this tree is hard, thick and very durable. For this reason, it is mainly used in outdoor furniture production. The furniture produced from the Iroko hardwood can be used for many years without losing the form of its appearance on its first day. In addition to these magnificent features of the Iroko tree, the value of the highly beneficial tree increased more, because of the recently discovered ecological balance.
Olivier de Schutter, Reporter of the United Nations Food Expert, thinks that Iroko trees can play a role in combating climate change with the exploration of the long-term carbon sequestration effect. Iroko trees can transform carbon dioxide emissions into micro-scale limestone enriching the soil. This process consists of several actions: the carbon dioxide is cleared from the atmosphere and the dry, acidic soil is made more efficient for agriculture.
Wood Carbon Dioxide Converts to Limestone
Iroko trees are only one of the handful of species found in Africa and the Amazon, which convert carbon atmospheric to limestone minerals. In this study, scientists looked at many germ-tree combinations to lock and recognize carbon dioxide as limestone, and they found that the Iroko-microbe route gave the best result.
From the Faculty of Geosciences at Edinburgh University – Bryene Ngwenya said the following “By utilizing this natural limestone production process, we can enrich farming conditions in tropical countries while keeping carbon in the atmosphere easy, safe, low-tech and easy to work with”.
In the developing world there is great potential for afforestation projects to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Together with the use of micro- and Iroko trees, afforestation programs can improve soil fertility, improve the carbon sequestration balance of carbon trade initiatives, and even be used to promote agroforestry for the benefit of rural communities.

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